Hiding The Truth: What The Super Bowl Taught Me

I’m not sure why I decided to watch the Super Bowl yesterday; maybe all the hype and also that it was rainy and cold outside, became my impetus to watch. I started to watch bits and pieces a few years ago because of the half time entertainment and the commercials. But this time, Super Bowl 51, from start to finish. I’m still not sure I understand the game, but the excitement was palpable and I enjoyed the energy from the players, spectators/fans and sportscasters. Every once in awhile I checked into Twitter and Facebook to read the comments. I have to admit the seesaw of the game Falcon to Patriots was nerve racking (reminded me how tense I get watching winter and summer Olympic events) and then the Patriots won! I had no stake in the game as far as who I wanted to win. Gone our the days of school Super Bowl pools (random numbers assigned) with my only caveat that I knew who won before I headed back to school! I felt bad for the Falcons and happy for the Patriots. It was really nice not to think about politics for a few hours. But as I sat watching I thought how strange to find myself here. A sport that doesn’t resonate with me, teams that are not my home teams, but still I watched. How easily I could pass for someone who knew what was going on? How much I cared that I was part of this clique of sport aficionados, surprised me.  And then came a connection to school and kids. If it was important for me to be part of this group of Super Bowl fans and then really hide that I was clueless, how is it for our students who face struggles at home, at school or with peers. We ask so much of our students and no matter how we embrace and validate differences, for some and at times, that’s just not where it’s at for them. Those who are challenged as readers, writers and math learners, as they look around at peers who just seem to “get it,” I wonder how much of their energy is used to “hide” that they don’t understand the material. And then they can’t pretend anymore.  It is up to us to build the relationships needed to instill trust between us and our students; and that’s where hope comes in. That’s when I hope there is that someone, that teacher, that mentor to guide them to become the learners all kids can become.

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4 Responses to Hiding The Truth: What The Super Bowl Taught Me

  1. Such an important point, Faige! This makes me think more about how do we build these relationships and in all different grades. I know that “relationships” seem to be a really important part of our Kindergarten Program, and in the past couple of years, I’ve found myself really focusing on these relationships. I wonder if with the worry of curriculum expectations (which seem to be so much greater past K), if we always remember to take the time to also build these meaningful relationships. I’m curious to know what others do.

    Aviva

    • faige says:

      In a world of getting curriculum covered I too see the impact it has on building relationships. Teachers with child development background value the importance in whatever grade they teach. But it’s a tight call out there.

      • I agree. As I read your comment, I think about how much I’ve learned from my teaching partner: an RECE (Registered Early Childhood Educator). Her background in child development makes a huge difference. I think about how much we could all learn from Early Childhood Educators.

        Aviva

  2. Such an important point, Faige! This makes me think more about how do we build these relationships and in all different grades. I know that “relationships” seem to be a really important part of our Kindergarten Program, and in the past couple of years, I’ve found myself really focusing on these relationships. I wonder if with the worry of curriculum expectations (which seem to be so much greater past K), if we always remember to take the time to also build these meaningful relationships. I’m curious to know what others do.

    Aviva

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